Chinese tibetan Pubajia, sing at the closing ceremony in the Special Olympic

Pubajia, together with 4 other countries singier sing at the closing ceremony in the Special Olympic in Shanghai. He is representing Asia while the 4 othere represent the other 4 continents.

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8 Responses to “Chinese tibetan Pubajia, sing at the closing ceremony in the Special Olympic”

  1. GunsNRoses Says:

    Pubajia – What can he say or do as being Tibetan in China who is captive of China’s materialism and rule by terror. Trust me once Tibetan, will always remain Tibetan. Mr rbu Gya is true son of Tibet. BTW .. please do not sinicise his name.

  2. GunsNRoses Says:

    Pubajia – What can he say or do as being Tibetan in China who is captive of China’s materialism and rule by terror. Trust me, once Tibetan, will always be Tibetan. Mr Phurbu Gya is true son of Tibet.

    BTW .. please do not sinicise his name.

  3. tigerloong Says:

    It’s very surprising. Why didn’t you comment them on following post, his tibetan-english name was showed.

    Chinese star Purba Rgyal (Pubajia),a tibetan
    https://tigerloong.wordpress.com/2008/03/26/chinese-tibetan-star/
    Purba Rgyal (蒲巴甲Pubajia) won the best of China Lycra “My Hero”(加油,好男儿) in 2006, the TV show likes American Idol, and having millions of fans throughout China.

    BTW. TV show is terror? The Special Olympic is terror?

  4. zuzu Says:

    China Is Chinese
    Tibet Is Tibetan
    India Is Indians

  5. zuzu Says:

    Tibetan culture developed under the influence of a number of factors. Tibet’s specific geographic and climactic conditions- its altitude, short growing season, and cold weather- have encouraged reliance on pastorialism, as well as the development of a different cuisine from surrounding regions. Contact with neighboring countries and cultures- including India, China, and Mongolia- have influenced the development of Tibetan culture, but the Himalayan region’s remoteness and inaccessibility have preserved distinctive local influences. Buddhism has exerted a particularly strong influence on Tibetan culture since its introduction in the 7th Century. Art, literature, and music all contain elements of Buddhist religion, and Buddhism itself has adopted a unique form in Tibet, influenced by the Bön tradition and other local beliefs.

  6. zuzu Says:

    The 1959 Tibetan uprising, or 1959 Tibetan Rebellion began on 10 March 1959, when an anti-Chinese and anti-communist revolt erupted in Lhasa, the capital of Tibet, which had been under the reign of the Communist Party of China since the Invasion of Tibet in 1950.[4] Although the 14th Dalai Lama’s flight occurred in 1959, armed conflict between Tibetan rebellion forces and the Chinese army started in 1956 in the Kham and Amdo regions, which were subjected to socialist reform. The guerrilla warfare later spread to other areas of Tibet and lasted through 1962.

  7. Lin Chen Says:

    The 13th Dalai Lama returned to Tibet from India in July 1912 (after the fall of the Qing dynasty), and expelled the Amban and all Chinese troops.[31] In 1913, the Dalai Lama issued a proclamation that stated that the relationship between the Chinese emperor and Tibet “had been that of patron and priest and had not been based on the subordination of one to the other.”[32] “We are a small, religious, and independent nation,” the proclamation continued.[32] For the next thirty-six years, Tibet enjoyed de facto independence while China endured its Warlord era, civil war, and World War II. However, no country, including China, has ever recognised Tibet as an independent country

  8. ma lai yang Says:

    In the history of Tibet, it has been an independent country,[1] divided into different kingdoms and states, and a part of the Chinese empire, each for a certain amount of time. Today it is controlled by People’s Republic of China (PRC). The government of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the Government of Tibet in Exile, however, disagree over the definition of Tibet, and whether its incorporation into China is legitimate according to international law.


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